Dressing in Europe

le métro se lèveEurope is a popular destination for American travelers. Whether it is a business trip or one for the purpose of tourism, Europe is full of places and events to attend which are sure to keep your agenda filled. As a business person, however, it is important to always distinguish between American and European cultures, while it is also important to remember that Europe is comprised of 50 different countries. Dressing in a different continent involves dressing differently, in order to account for different factors, such as climate, culture, on-going events, and activities planned for the trip. In order to check for some of these factors, you can search up in the internet travel guidebooks or official tourism websites that can give you information on the weather and many other factors that may affect your trip.

It is generally believed (in America, anyway) that Europeans dress ‘better’ than Americans. This is because Americans focus more on a casual comfort type of attire, which gives us a better general rule for dressing in Europe. You should always aim to dress better than you would for the same occasion in the United States. The article “Europeans dress better than Americans: Fact” for the bangsandabun.com website, the views are shared by the writer on why this notion is accepted. Now, let’s look at some relevant situations to be taken into consideration for choosing an attire while traveling in Europe.

Winter Weather

Scandinavian countries have very harsh winters. For example, in Sweden it gets down into the 20-30 degrees Fahrenheit in the south and to less than 10 degrees Fahrenheit in the north. Coastal cities can be humid, making the winters feel even colder. If you’re visiting in winter, you will need thick insulated jackets, thermal long underwear, waterproof gloves and scarves and hats.

Summers in Europe

As you move toward the south of the continent, the winters get warmer. If you’re traveling to Greece or Spain, you can expect winters with temperatures in the 50s or higher and little to no snow. Summers are cooler in northern Europe and hotter and more humid as you move south. If you’re visiting during the summer, bring a light jacket and some long pants with you in case the temperatures drop in the evening.

Casual Attire

Casual attire is common in Europe, but you might need to follow special rules when visiting churches, cathedrals, the Vatican Museums and certain palaces and castles. In many of those places, sleeveless tops and shorts are not allowed. Women must wear skirts long enough to cover their knees, and keep their shoulders covered. A large shawl draped over the shoulders should be enough if you’re wearing a summer dress or tank top and don’t want to change. Jeans are considered very casual in Europe. They’re fine for a day out touring the town, but not for dinner at a nice restaurant, even if you pair it up with a nice shirt.

Formal Attire

When dining out or trying to gain entry to posh clubs, cabaret shows, and other formal venues, you will need formal attire. For men, this could be something as simple as wearing a blazer on top of your shirt. Some five-star restaurants, especially in big cities like Paris or London, might also require a tie. Moulin Rouge, in Paris, for example, requires a minimum of a business attire: no flip-flops, no jeans, no shorts or T-shirts.

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Shanna Wu Pecoraro, AICI CIP

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