The Do’s and Don’ts of Public Transport

As city dwellers, most of us find ourselves frequently sitting or standing on a crowded bus, subway, or in a busy transit station en route to or from somewhere. In these situations, our team tends to take an extra moment and engage in one of our favorite pastimes: people watching. This can be as entertaining as any film, TV show or podcast can deliver – but transit etiquette (and lack thereof) also reminds us the importance of maintaining ourselves in public spaces.

 

 

Here are a few tips you’ll want to consider for your next train or subway ride!

 

Listen to the conductor. Tips provided over loudspeakers are made to alert you to schedule and route changes, as well as urgent alerts. Pay attention, and lower your voice when the conductor’s voice comes on, so that others around you can hear as well.

 

Hold onto your trash until you can throw it away. No one likes a litterbug, and plus, holding your items until you can recycle / dispose of them properly saves transit staff from cleanup efforts (which cost everyone in the long run).

 

Stand back from the edge of the platform. Don’t risk your personal safety by being an inch too close to a train barreling toward you. Stand at least one foot back from the edge.

 

Board and de-board the train efficiently. When your train arrives, the correct procedure is to stand aside and queue at either door to allow exiting passengers off first, therein creating much-needed space. Doing the opposite delays everyone – including subsequent train arrivals.

 

Have your ticket/tokens ready before you enter the ticketed area. Don’t wait until you’re halfway through the turnstile to dig out your ticket. This slows you down, and everyone who might be behind you.

 

Being aware and considerate will make you a much happier rider, which you can pass on to your fellow riders.

 

What are your top tips for subway riders?  Tell us on Twitter, or tag us in your next post on Instagram!  https://bit.ly/1OROobY

The Benefits of Set A Dinner Time  

Whether you live alone, with a spouse, or have oodles of kids, pulling together an evening meal requires planning and consideration.  The first and most important thing to determine is the time at which the meal will be served. Once this time is set and regularly adhered to, many other benefits come into play.

With a set dining schedule, you’re likely to find yourself enamored with:

 

Healthy options. Kids who eat with their families regularly tend to have healthier eating patterns. They consume fewer sodas, fried foods and saturated fat, and tend to consume more fruits and vegetables, according to the American Dietetic Association.

 

Increased communication skills. When you eat as a family, your opportunities for communication are likely to improve. A “Family Dinner Experiment” conducted by Oprah Winfrey in 1993 challenged five families to eat dinner together every night for a month, for at least 30 minutes. At first, the families found it challenging but by the end of the study, they wanted to continue the practice! The biggest surprise for the parents was “how much their children treasured the dependable time with their parents at the table”.

 

Routines make you feel happier. Researchers at Syracuse University found that family routines such as eating dinner together nightly are associated with happier marriages, improved children’s health, and stronger family ties.

 

Finally, while eating with others – family, friends or colleagues – it’s important to remember the Golden Rule: Do Unto Others as You Would Have Done Unto You. At dinner, avoid excessive gossip and sharing of secrets. Put your mobile phones away for the entirety of dinner. Try not to make fun of people, and avoid making up stories. When you set an example and focus on what you want to see in the world (instead of complaining about what you don’t see), you’ll find it easier to actualize the vision you are seeking.

 

And that can all start with your dinner, at a set dinnertime!

 

What time do you eat dinner?  Tell us, and find more of our etiquette tips as well as our fashion and styling insights by following us on Instagram:  https://bit.ly/1OROobY

Teach Others How to Dine Like a Lady?

At some point, we’ve all been there. Sitting at a business luncheon, someone places their arms on the table, rattles all the plates and silverware and makes a loud spectacle of eating their meal. Viewing such a scene in the film “Pretty Woman” would be hysterical.. but in real life, sitting at such a table – where you’re trying to focus on business and relationship building – is less than ideal.

 

We all learn how to do things differently.  Our parents, mentors, and teachers show us how to eat, talk, drive a car, and be present in the world. In this age of hyper-competitive business, norms have been developed to allow participants to socialize while working at the same time. Workers, younger and older, crave proper training for different situations so that they stand out for the right reasons, and not the wrong ones!

If you’ve mastered the art of formal dining, consider taking your skills to the next level. Being confident in the art of formal business dining is an increasingly important skill, and well-equipped teachers are needed in tech-friendly cities all over the world.  We offer such a course, as part of our “Become a Corporate Trainer: A Training for Trainers Who Care About Soft Skills”, taking place in Taipei, Taiwan, September 12 – 16, 2018.  The course covers not only formal business dining, but it also covers international business etiquette and ways to build a brand that has impact. This new course is part of the International Soft Skills Testing Accreditation, or ISSTA, which provides a universal standard of professional soft skills in all industries.

 

You can learn more about the course here: www.nyciet.com

 

Next time you’re at a formal business function, take a look around.  Who could use a little help from someone like you?

 

And let us know: what’s been the most horrifying business lunch you’ve attended?

Share with us on Facebook!

 

 

Ethics, Clients, and You

If you are an image consultant, you are expected to be responsible. That not only means responding to client calls, incoming emails, and being timely to appointments. It means you hold professional ethics in high regard. And while our current political state might make it seem that ethics can be put to the side, we heartily disagree.

 

As image consultants, we must always maintain our sense of integrity so that we protect the relationship between professionals, who are, after all, individuals.

 

Occasionally, we have observed image consultants using a questionable sense of integrity. This happens when someone uses a credential under false representation; it happens when someone lets a valid certification expire but does not acknowledge a change in her/his professional status.

 

In some cases, these consultants’ ethics have been compromised unknowingly, whereas in others there’s been a blatant disregard for what is right and wrong.

 

Using a credential under false representation is essentially unethical; you can’t say you’re a doctor if you’re not a doctor, and you can’t say you’re an AICI certified image consultant unless you’ve actually been certified. Being certified is a fact, and a fact is something that can be checked. It can be proven, and if you mislead about your credentials, your statement of false-fact may eventually be unproven and your integrity will be compromised.

 

Knowing that your certification has expired yet presenting that you are a professional with the credential anyway is an example of known disregard because you are lying about your professional status.

 

In AICI, we have 3 certification levels.  There is the CIC, or Certified Image Consultant.  There is the CIP, or Certified Image Professional. And then there is the CIM, or Certified Image Master (which is also the most advanced). If you haven’t been credentialed and would like to explore your options, talk to someone at AICI International Board or reach out to your mentor, but do not make use of certifications you don’t actually carry.

 

In case it’s helpful, the link for AICI’s Code of Conduct can be accessed here:

https://c.ymcdn.com/sites/aici.site-ym.com/resource/resmgr/documents/AICI_Code_of_Accreditation_D.pdf

 

We look forward to your thoughts and comments on this matter!

Local Holidays and Customs Prepareness

Many of us can think of a time we’ve traveled to a new place, excited to visit a specific venue or museum or shop – and arrived to discover that the special place was closed that day due to a local Holiday! This happens more than you might think, to clients and travelers we’ve talked to.

A savvy traveler can get annoyed from time to time in these scenarios, but the test of a true traveler is flexibility and preparedness. Travelers also can be surprised by local customs in many regions. Here are a few examples of scenarios that folks we know have encountered, and how they rose above frustration and were able to make the most of it!

  • Looking ahead to online listings and calendars in the locale you’re about to visit is a good practice, always. In Germany, for instance, we recently learned about Reformation Day, a holiday that is typically observed in the southern-most states of the country. 2017 marked the 500-year anniversary of the holiday, and as such it was observed nationally, where nearly every public institution and business was closed. Considering this date also fell on Halloween, many tourists were surprised by the empty streets and closed establishments. Many found beauty and tranquility, however, in the amazing public parks featuring stunning Autumn foliage!
  • Prepare yourself for customs in business, always. In Japan, for example, it is considered rude to display cash in public; using an envelope is strongly preferred. In business, your preparedness to customs like this shows your sense of integrity and may win you deeper business connections as a result.
  • Be prepared to smile and embrace a practice that seems a bit, well, foreign! Take kids in Greece, as well as many children in Bulgaria and Albania. When they lose a tooth, they throw the tooth on the roof of their house and say a little poem to encourage strong adult-tooth return. Embracing this while visiting, especially if you see it happening, will earn you accolades from your host.

Guidebooks, online searches and brief Q&A with friends or acquaintances who’ve traveled where you’re going, are all solid resources to consider before traveling. And just remember – keeping an open mind and a flexible schedule will allow you to see the beauty in everything!

Invitation Etiquette Essentials

About a month ago, I received an invitation (via email) to an intimate wine and cheese party, hosted by a good friend I’ve known for a year or so. I responded quickly (for 2), and on the eve of the event brought my husband along to enjoy a lovely pre-dinner party with the host and a few of her friends. After such a delightful evening, I was dismayed the next morning when said host informed me privately that several invitees had never responded to her invite – and to top it off, that out of nine individuals who registered “yes”, two of them did not show up to the event!

Clients and friends often ask us about what’s proper in these scenarios, so we wanted to share a few basic reminders to help you keep courtesy top of mind, at all times – and for anything special you’ve been invited to.

 

Invitations: Always acknowledge that you’ve received an invitation within 24 hours. If you need a few days to consider or arrange your schedule, that’s ok – but letting your host know that you’re in receipt of the message is the right thing to do.

 

Respond in kind: If you receive an invitation via postal mail, respond via postal mail. If you receive an invitation via phone call, respond via phone call or voicemail. If you receive an invitation via email, respond via email (in the same thread). If you receive an invite via social media it is ok to RSVP publicly but you should always send a private “thank you” to the host, showing your gratitude for including you.

 

Stuck? Need to Cancel?: It occasionally happens to us all – our kid gets sick, we get stuck at work. As soon as you know you’ll be late or have to cancel, reach out to the host yourself (don’t make your assistant do it). And remember, unless a local official has declared a state of emergency, “it’s raining/snowing outside” is never an appropriate reason to skip attending an invited event. Suck it up and head over, just as you’d want your friends to show up for you.

 

Saying Thank-You: Within 24 hours, send a brief thank-you note to your host via postal mail. If getting to the post isn’t possible within a day or so, an email is also acceptable (but not as delightful as receiving a physical, personal thank-you).

 

Relationships take work, and maintaining them requires effort on both parts. Even when you’re in a busy period of life, remembering to take a few minutes out to show gratitude to those who’ve included you will pay off later in life.

Armrest Wars: Who has the right to rest an arm?!

Traveling internationally can generate feelings that are equal parts disappointment and excitement, annoyance and joy. Few things frustrate our friends and clients more than getting into an armrest war with a fellow passenger on a plane or train!

 

Here are a few best practices we follow to avoid such situations, whether we’re traveling for work or not:

 

  • When your flight is full, the person in the middle seat gets both armrests. They are likely feeling the most squished and should be allowed the extra comfort – and this makes things fair for the two passengers on the sides.
  • If you are boarding and see that things may get tight, observe the rest of the plane. If it’s not a full flight, ask your fellow passenger if she/he minds spreading to the sides and leaving the middle seat open. Or, ask a flight attendant to help you move to another row.
  • On a train, where it’s typically 2-seats by 2-seats, the person on the window gets the middle armrest because the passenger on the aisle already has an armrest. If someone isn’t cooperating, try to move to a different row. If seats are assigned, ask the conductor to help you transfer to another car with an officially empty seat.

 

The most important thing to remember is your sense of patience – and if someone is exceptionally difficult, ask an attendant to help you! They are trained in conflict resolution among passengers and can often provide help quickly so that you don’t have to get worked up. And remember to take a deep breath.. no flight or train ride lasts forever; it will be over sooner than you think!

 

In case you are feeling alone in your armrest frustrations – fear not, and for a knowing laugh about what NOT to do on a plane, check out the Instagram account of @passengershaming (not for tender eyes!)

 

How do you share the armrest when you travel?