Four Easy Steps to Organizing Your Closet and Simplifying Your Life

Imagine: you walk into your closet, and everything looks interesting and inviting.  You can’t wait for tomorrow to get dressed. Wait — is this a dream? Is such a feeling even possible?

Yes, with plenty of assurance, we can say that it is possible to live with a clean and organized closet on a regular basis.

Follow the steps below (as a checklist) to make your closet as inviting as you can imagine. The results of an organized closet will make your life simpler and more enjoyable, and getting dressed in the morning will never be the same!

Closet space

Step 1.  De-clutter

  • Remove all dry cleaning plastic bags
  • Get rid of mismatched hangers
  • Choose one hanger style that suits you and will look good in your pretty closet
  • Find a separate place for items unrelated to getting dressed.

Your closet is not a place to store golf bags, old clothes, or other people’s   belongings: out with the excess baggage, and in with the things you actually wear!

Step 2.  Decorate

  • Start with color. Give your closet a lift by taking everything out of it and repainting. A softer, lighter color is often a good place to start
  • Place overhead lights in the far left corner, or install light fixtures so that every item in your closet gets an equal spotlight

Step 3.  Display

  • Keep everything as visible to the eye as possible:
  • Sweaters, jeans and T-shirts can be folded neatly on open shelves
  • Use a jewelry stand or add hooks to the wall to hold necklaces
  • Scarf and belt racks help you see what you have
  • When you walk into your closest and see all possibilities, getting dressed will soon become easier and fun

Step 4.  De-stress

  • Add a wonderful scent that you enjoy. Cedar or lavender sachets will help keep your closet and drawers smelling fresh, not stale.

Now that life and energy has been brought into your closet, ask yourself: does your wardrobe need more attention? No problem! We are here to help you perform these tasks and more, in order to create ease within your personal wardrobe.  We’ll help you make your closet look fabulous for the season, and many seasons to come.

Is your closet normally clean or dirty? Tell us on Twitter @nycimageacademy.

Shanna Wu Pecoraro

For more information please visit www.nycimageconsultantacademy.com

#consulting, #etiquette, #fashion, #image

This Season, Let Your Suit Speak For You

Some of us put on a suit daily, while some of us wear one occasionally and some of us only “pull out the old suit” every few years to attend a wedding or a funeral. Male executives tend to fall into the former category, and often tell us how they’ve slipped into the same routine of “is it the grey, blue, or black suit today”?

Regardless of what your day-to-day look requires or if you actually put on “a suit” there are ways to own “the suit” you wear while holding true to your personality.  Whether you’re inherently sporty, creative, or super polished – you can use a suit to enhance and extend your personality along with your professional influence. Gray suit

If you’re in finance, legal, or a profession where you handle people’s money and life choices, it’s imperative that your look reflects a sense of competence and trustworthiness. When choosing the color of a suit, go for something dark (navy, charcoal, or black). Go with a solid or pinstripe pattern, and style your suit to be classic and appropriate.

 

If you’re in fashion, advertising, or a similar field, your suit’s color should be more sophisticated: blue grey, burgundy, or even a blue-brown. Mixing and matching your patterns makes more sense here, and to enhance your individual style, you can play with different colors and fabrics to bring out your natural personality.

 

If you’re in a customer-service oriented business, you’ll want to go for a friendly and helpful tone in your look.  Go for a solid-colored suit, but add a warm color for any accessories; a pocket square, tie, or watch will do nicely. Keep the pattern of your shirt and tie friendly – checks and plaids often go best, and keep the styling and fit comfortable and relaxed.

If in doubt, always think about the objective you’re trying to achieve and the traits you want to be known for.  Based on those traits, your suit should portray you as professional, befitting your personality and your lifestyle.

© 2015 by Shanna Pecoraro, NYC Image Consultant Academy

For permission requests, write an email to Shanna Wu Pecoraro at shanna@nycimageconsultantacademy.com

What’s your favorite look on men? Tell us on Twitter @nycimageacademy.

Shanna Wu Pecoraro, AICI CIP

For more information please visit www.nycimageconsultantacademy.com

#business, #calvin-klein, #consulting, #consulting-for-men-2, #fashion, #fashion-spotlight, #image, #image-consulting, #mens-fashion, #menswear, #new-york-city

Is color “the most important thing for a woman?”

“Color is the most important thing for a woman” – Angela Merkel, Chancellor of Germany, in The New Yorker, December 2014

Which blue is your blue

Color is more than science, and it’s more than aesthetics. To those we encounter on a daily basis, color communicates different qualities to which emotions are assigned on various levels. Some of these are temporary hints of emotion; some result in being long-term signifiers of your personality.

Fascination with color is everywhere. Think of paintings. Think about your favorite logos – would they still be your favorites if they were shaded in a different color?

Last year, The Atlantic Monthly gave a great nod to the importance of color and its study, and highlighted the brilliantly laid-out app called Interaction of Color, which is based on a book by Josef Albers.
Colors can make us feel older or younger than we are. They can make us feel energetic, or quite the opposite. They can make us feel happy, sad, or indifferent. Colors can physically make our bodies feel hot (ever worn black in the heat of summer?), or cold (ever worn a white jacket in winter, and been asked if you’re warm enough?). Colors can be tested while dressing, to enhance a mood of sweetness or bitterness, which naturally affect the way you perceive yourself, visually and psychologically.

There is much to be studied about color, and stylists should always think of color as more than just variations on a theme in a client’s wardrobe. (In fact, here at the NYC Image Consultant Academy, our Personal Color Palette reference tool contains 20 personal palettes with color combination charts, and 4 reference color palettes.)

Here are a few pointers to think about when deciding how to interpret color variations that work for you or your clients:

  • Light colors are perceived to be more friendly and approachable, while dark colors are stronger and more dynamic
  • Light colors move visually outward, and darker colors move visually inward
  • Generally, light colors are more gentle while dark colors are perceived to be more severe
  • Bright colors send a message of enthusiasm, fun, and excitement
  • Dark colors absorb light, and can sometimes seem formal or conservative
  • Colors in the middle range (think of “cream”) are perceived as classic and more neutral
  • Warm colors are thought of as earthy, friendly, and approachable. Cool colors are thought of as classic, authoritative, and refined.

What’s your favorite color to wear? Tell us on Twitter @nycimageacademy.

Shanna Wu Pecoraro

For more information please visit www.nycimageconsultantacademy.com

#consulting, #fashion, #image, #image-consulting, #shanna-pecoraro

Guys: Here Are The Styling Tips No-one Has Told You Before

It was once said that ladies represented “the fairer sex”, while the idea of the gentleman signified a braver, more serious gender.  Any truths related to these assumptions may be due to human genetics, one’s upbringing, or both.  You can check out shows like Mad Men(AMC Networks) for brilliant examples of characters dressing for success.  By following the classic rules of dressing, these characters always looked their very best.

Science and television aside, the world in 2014 maintains a certain code of basics for men and women’s fashion; following such a code can help men embrace the shapes, colors, and styles that build confidence and increase the affect of their personal brand.  Here are the styling tips no-one has told you before:

Dress for Success

Color

It is important to think about the relationship between your complexion and your outfit.  If you have a higher contrast between your hair, skin and eyes, then you should add a stronger color contrast to your outfit.  Try to use your body’s natural pigments in your outfits; accentuate your handsome eyes, freckles and smile!

And for accessories, if you don’t know which tie to wear, wear one that’s the same color as your shirt – it’s the easiest way to complete your outfit.

Shirts and Pants

When it comes to shirts, if you have a rounded face you should use long, pointed collars.  If you have a narrow face, you should use spread collars.  It’s a similar paradigm with pants: If you have a long torso with short legs, avoid low-rise pants.  If you have wider hips, look for suit jackets with side vents.

Jackets

Your seams should fall along the shoulder, always, and the length of your sleeve should allow some shirt cuff to show.  ¼ inch – ½ inch is acceptable; jackets and shirts will vary slightly in length.  Play with these, as you’ll usually enhance your look by contrasting the jacket with the shirt colors at the end of the arm.

Ties

Your bow ties should fit within the frame of the outer edges of your eyes.  Normal ties should reach the middle of your belt buckle; no longer, no shorter.

What’s your favorite look on men? Tell us on Twitter @nycimageacademy.

Shanna Wu Pecoraro

For more information please visit www.nycimageconsultantacademy.com

Gifting, Re-gifting, and Giving in Your 2015

Plenty of people, it seems, stress about holiday gifts.  From the inscription on the card to delivery methods, to the actual gift or service (or gift card, as the case seems to increasingly include), we worry whether what we’re gifting is appropriate and will be received with delight.

What we don’t speak about as often is the challenge of what to do with that gift you didn’t ask for, or that doesn’t fit, or that just doesn’t work.   As a receiver, do you politely return or exchange your gift, and as a gift giver, how can you reduce the likelihood of giving a bad gift in the future?

Happy New Year!

We suggest a few tips as a gifting best practice, here:

  • Re-gifting is recycling. It’s actually a fairly innovative practice, but should be used sparingly and with as much thoughtfulness as you would expend in purchasing a brand new gift.
  • Re-gifted items should always include their original box from the store or site, and original manufacturer wrapping if at all possible.
  • Don’t re-gift something that you know the receiver would never desire. It is better not to gift at all than to place your host/friend in an awkward situation.
  • Do not re-gift items like fresh food, or personal items that involve size and color (like hats, gloves, scarfs or clothing). If something is vintage or truly retro, note it in the message inside your card.
  • Whether it’s a re-gift or an original purchase, if you think your gift’s receiver may not understand the intent behind the gift, write a nice sentence or two about your idea for its use in the corresponding card. Or, if you’re going to exchange gifts in-person and the timing is appropriate, nudge the person and explain your intention. This can help to eliminate questions and ease your anxious “Gifter” mind.

It may seem like long away, but the 2015 Holidays will be here before we know it.  To avoid gifter’s anxiety, start to designate a section of a drawer or closet as your “Gift Storage” to save a few unisex or last minute gifts that could be appreciated by most anyone.  Use this place to store items you’ve received that are unused and worthy of a possible re-gift.  Include a few roles of wrapping paper (solid colors without a holiday theme are best) as well as a few gift bags with handles, a few blank cards, and a pair of scissors and tape.  This will help you be prepared for any unexpected situations – and come out ahead.

Here’s to your season of giving in 2015!

Shanna Wu Pecoraro

For more information please visit www.nycimageconsultantacademy.com

This Season, Let Your Suit Speak For You

Some of us put on a suit daily, while some of us wear one occasionally and some of us only “pull out the old suit” every few years to attend a wedding or a funeral. Male executives tend to fall into the former category, and often tell us how they’ve slipped into the same routine of “is it the grey, blue, or black suit today”?

Regardless of what your day-to-day look requires or if you actually put on “a suit” there are ways to own “the suit” you wear while holding true to your personality.  Whether you’re inherently sporty, creative, or super polished – you can use a suit to enhance and extend your personality along with your professional influence.

If you’re in finance, legal, or a profession where you handle people’s money and life choices, it’s imperative that your look reflects a sense of competence and trustworthiness. When choosing the color of a suit, go for something dark (navy, charcoal, or black). Go with a solid or pinstripe pattern, and style your suit to be classic and appropriate.

Classic ensemble

If you’re in fashion, advertising, or a similar field, your suit’s color should be more sophisticated: blue grey, burgundy, or even a blue-brown. Mixing and matching your patterns makes more sense here, and to enhance your individual style, you can play with different colors and fabrics to bring out your natural personality.

Suit with personality

If you’re in a customer-service oriented business, you’ll want to go for a friendly and helpful tone in your look.  Go for a solid-colored suit, but add a warm color for any accessories; a pocket square, tie, or watch will do nicely. Keep the pattern of your shirt and tie friendly – checks and plaids often go best, and keep the styling and fit comfortable and relaxed.

If in doubt, always think about the objective you’re trying to achieve and the traits you want to be known for.  Based on those traits, your suit should portray you as professional, befitting your personality and your lifestyle.

© 2015 by Shanna Wu Pecoraro, NYC Image Consultant Academy

For permission requests, write an email to Shanna Pecoraro at shanna@nycimageconsultantacademy.com

Shanna Wu Pecoraro

For more information please visit www.nycimageconsultantacademy.com

Is color “the most important thing for a woman”?

“Color is the most important thing for a woman” – Angela Merkel, Chancellor of Germany, in The New Yorker, December 2014

Which blue is your blue

Color is more than science, and it’s more than aesthetics. To those we encounter on a daily basis, color communicates different qualities to which emotions are assigned on various levels. Some of these are temporary hints of emotion; some result in being long-term signifiers of your personality.

Fascination with color is everywhere. Think of paintings. Think about your favorite logos – would they still be your favorites if they were shaded in a different color?

Last year, The Atlantic Monthly gave a great nod to the importance of color and its study, and highlighted the brilliantly laid-out app called Interaction of Color, which is based on a book by Josef Albers.
Colors can make us feel older or younger than we are. They can make us feel energetic, or quite the opposite. They can make us feel happy, sad, or indifferent. Colors can physically make our bodies feel hot (ever worn black in the heat of summer?), or cold (ever worn a white jacket in winter, and been asked if you’re warm enough?). Colors can be tested while dressing, to enhance a mood of sweetness or bitterness, which naturally affect the way you perceive yourself, visually and psychologically.

There is much to be studied about color, and stylists should always think of color as more than just variations on a theme in a client’s wardrobe. (In fact, here at SP Image Consulting, our Personal Color Palette reference tool contains 20 personal palettes with color combination charts, and 4 reference color palettes.)

Here are a few pointers to think about when deciding how to interpret color variations that work for you or your clients:

  • Light colors are perceived to be more friendly and approachable, while dark colors are stronger and more dynamic
  • Light colors move visually outward, and darker colors move visually inward
  • Generally, light colors are more gentle while dark colors are perceived to be more severe
  • Bright colors send a message of enthusiasm, fun, and excitement
  • Dark colors absorb light, and can sometimes seem formal or conservative
  • Colors in the middle range (think of “cream”) are perceived as classic and more neutral
  • Warm colors are thought of as earthy, friendly, and approachable. Cool colors are thought of as classic, authoritative, and refined.

There’s much more to say about color. What color looks best on you? Why?

Shanna Wu Pecoraro

For more information please visit www.nycimageconsultantacademy.com