How Hillary Clinton Can Win the Public’s Likability Vote

There are less than 18 months before the next US President is elected. Much can happen between now and then in the political sphere, but one action that will help Hillary’s campaign — regardless of politics – would be to improve her visual image.

If we were to work with the former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton on such a project, these are 10 recommendations on colors and overall look that we’d suggest for making her visually “pop”, which would increase her likability and thus increase chances for positive reaction from voters.

Hillary Clinton color palette & Style

Drop the warm colors, like yellow, orange, olive green, and brown. They don’t flatter her skin tone. Stay within the color palettes to the right.

  • This ash blue jacket (see number 2) is a great option for spring and summer, worn with a pair of dark blue or navy pants (see number 8).
  • Remember the jacket length should never end in her widest part of the hip, which will emphasize the width.
  • Number 7 is the ideal dress shape for Hillary, but she should add ¾ sleeves on the dress when worn without a short cardigan or jacket
  • Although the dress color in number 7 is a little too bright for her, she should choose a color within her color palette (See number 1) and wear it with a matching-colored jacket or coat for an executive look.
  • A-line skirts just below the knee length work well on her frame; stay preferential to those while she is running for office.
  • As a pant suit girl, try to stay away from skinny pants and tapped pants hem lines which accentuate the hips. Choose pants with no pockets or details on the backside.
  • Drop the all-black ensembles. The color makes her look older and tired. Instead of black, navy or charcoal gray will be a better choice.
  • Go with the coat in number 9 as the perfect coat for winter — it’s the perfect color, shape, and style!
  • She should keep her current hair color- it’s perfect, but should be cut shorter and have volume added with good styling.

How would you tell Hillary’s camp to upgrade her image? Tell us on Twitter @nycimageacademy.

Shanna Wu Pecoraro

For more information please visit www.nycimageconsultantacademy.com

#consulting, #etiquette, #fashion, #image, #image-consulting

This Season, Let Your Suit Speak For You

Some of us put on a suit daily, while some of us wear one occasionally and some of us only “pull out the old suit” every few years to attend a wedding or a funeral. Male executives tend to fall into the former category, and often tell us how they’ve slipped into the same routine of “is it the grey, blue, or black suit today”?

Regardless of what your day-to-day look requires or if you actually put on “a suit” there are ways to own “the suit” you wear while holding true to your personality.  Whether you’re inherently sporty, creative, or super polished – you can use a suit to enhance and extend your personality along with your professional influence. Gray suit

If you’re in finance, legal, or a profession where you handle people’s money and life choices, it’s imperative that your look reflects a sense of competence and trustworthiness. When choosing the color of a suit, go for something dark (navy, charcoal, or black). Go with a solid or pinstripe pattern, and style your suit to be classic and appropriate.

 

If you’re in fashion, advertising, or a similar field, your suit’s color should be more sophisticated: blue grey, burgundy, or even a blue-brown. Mixing and matching your patterns makes more sense here, and to enhance your individual style, you can play with different colors and fabrics to bring out your natural personality.

 

If you’re in a customer-service oriented business, you’ll want to go for a friendly and helpful tone in your look.  Go for a solid-colored suit, but add a warm color for any accessories; a pocket square, tie, or watch will do nicely. Keep the pattern of your shirt and tie friendly – checks and plaids often go best, and keep the styling and fit comfortable and relaxed.

If in doubt, always think about the objective you’re trying to achieve and the traits you want to be known for.  Based on those traits, your suit should portray you as professional, befitting your personality and your lifestyle.

© 2015 by Shanna Pecoraro, NYC Image Consultant Academy

For permission requests, write an email to Shanna Wu Pecoraro at shanna@nycimageconsultantacademy.com

What’s your favorite look on men? Tell us on Twitter @nycimageacademy.

Shanna Wu Pecoraro, AICI CIP

For more information please visit www.nycimageconsultantacademy.com

#business, #calvin-klein, #consulting, #consulting-for-men-2, #fashion, #fashion-spotlight, #image, #image-consulting, #mens-fashion, #menswear, #new-york-city

Is color “the most important thing for a woman?”

“Color is the most important thing for a woman” – Angela Merkel, Chancellor of Germany, in The New Yorker, December 2014

Which blue is your blue

Color is more than science, and it’s more than aesthetics. To those we encounter on a daily basis, color communicates different qualities to which emotions are assigned on various levels. Some of these are temporary hints of emotion; some result in being long-term signifiers of your personality.

Fascination with color is everywhere. Think of paintings. Think about your favorite logos – would they still be your favorites if they were shaded in a different color?

Last year, The Atlantic Monthly gave a great nod to the importance of color and its study, and highlighted the brilliantly laid-out app called Interaction of Color, which is based on a book by Josef Albers.
Colors can make us feel older or younger than we are. They can make us feel energetic, or quite the opposite. They can make us feel happy, sad, or indifferent. Colors can physically make our bodies feel hot (ever worn black in the heat of summer?), or cold (ever worn a white jacket in winter, and been asked if you’re warm enough?). Colors can be tested while dressing, to enhance a mood of sweetness or bitterness, which naturally affect the way you perceive yourself, visually and psychologically.

There is much to be studied about color, and stylists should always think of color as more than just variations on a theme in a client’s wardrobe. (In fact, here at the NYC Image Consultant Academy, our Personal Color Palette reference tool contains 20 personal palettes with color combination charts, and 4 reference color palettes.)

Here are a few pointers to think about when deciding how to interpret color variations that work for you or your clients:

  • Light colors are perceived to be more friendly and approachable, while dark colors are stronger and more dynamic
  • Light colors move visually outward, and darker colors move visually inward
  • Generally, light colors are more gentle while dark colors are perceived to be more severe
  • Bright colors send a message of enthusiasm, fun, and excitement
  • Dark colors absorb light, and can sometimes seem formal or conservative
  • Colors in the middle range (think of “cream”) are perceived as classic and more neutral
  • Warm colors are thought of as earthy, friendly, and approachable. Cool colors are thought of as classic, authoritative, and refined.

What’s your favorite color to wear? Tell us on Twitter @nycimageacademy.

Shanna Wu Pecoraro

For more information please visit www.nycimageconsultantacademy.com

#consulting, #fashion, #image, #image-consulting, #shanna-pecoraro

Existing Structure + Innovation / Challenge = Demand

What makes us want to do better?  For companies, it’s often the need for efficiency, bigger profits, or if nothing else, a need to make things easy and effortless.  Creators in the worlds of fashion design have tremendous examples to find inspiration in.  We’ll keep the spirit from the following examples in mind as we move into 2015.

Christian Dior stirred a good deal of controversy across Europe and the Americas in the late 1940’s with the introduction of the Bar Suit in Paris.  The pleated skirt and curved edges of the paired morning coat created what eventually became known as The New Look revolution, keeping women across the world baited in anticipation for similar looks becoming available from their local retailer.  The spirit of the New Look revolution continues to inspire the creative team at Dior on an ongoing basis.

Dior -Bar Suit

ASICS, the beloved shoe for runners, has remained dedicated to causes centered on  teamwork, exercise, and the environment since the company’s founder formed the company in the challenging culture of postwar Japan.  This dedication has likely aided the company in building lifelong relationships with runners and sports enthusiasts, while simultaneously helping philanthropic organizations.

And CITIZEN, the watchmaker, has been consistently acclaimed for its devotion to function and style matched with innovation.  This became especially apparent in the mid-1990’s after CITIZEN developed the Eco-Drive technology – an invention that enabled electrical power to be converted from light sources, eliminating the need for most watches to ever have their batteries replaced.  The brand’s recent ad campaign, called Better Starts Now (complete with a historical video) captures this mentality beautifully.

These are but a few examples of innovative brands we admire, and will look to as we look to the future of image consulting and the needs of the dreamers, creators, wives and husbands, children, and professionals our collective industry serves. Watch for more in January, with a regular look at innovation in our own industry and beyond.

Shanna Wu Pecoraro

For more information please visit www.nycimageconsultantacademy.com

This Season, Let Your Suit Speak For You

Some of us put on a suit daily, while some of us wear one occasionally and some of us only “pull out the old suit” every few years to attend a wedding or a funeral. Male executives tend to fall into the former category, and often tell us how they’ve slipped into the same routine of “is it the grey, blue, or black suit today”?

Regardless of what your day-to-day look requires or if you actually put on “a suit” there are ways to own “the suit” you wear while holding true to your personality.  Whether you’re inherently sporty, creative, or super polished – you can use a suit to enhance and extend your personality along with your professional influence.

If you’re in finance, legal, or a profession where you handle people’s money and life choices, it’s imperative that your look reflects a sense of competence and trustworthiness. When choosing the color of a suit, go for something dark (navy, charcoal, or black). Go with a solid or pinstripe pattern, and style your suit to be classic and appropriate.

Classic ensemble

If you’re in fashion, advertising, or a similar field, your suit’s color should be more sophisticated: blue grey, burgundy, or even a blue-brown. Mixing and matching your patterns makes more sense here, and to enhance your individual style, you can play with different colors and fabrics to bring out your natural personality.

Suit with personality

If you’re in a customer-service oriented business, you’ll want to go for a friendly and helpful tone in your look.  Go for a solid-colored suit, but add a warm color for any accessories; a pocket square, tie, or watch will do nicely. Keep the pattern of your shirt and tie friendly – checks and plaids often go best, and keep the styling and fit comfortable and relaxed.

If in doubt, always think about the objective you’re trying to achieve and the traits you want to be known for.  Based on those traits, your suit should portray you as professional, befitting your personality and your lifestyle.

© 2015 by Shanna Wu Pecoraro, NYC Image Consultant Academy

For permission requests, write an email to Shanna Pecoraro at shanna@nycimageconsultantacademy.com

Shanna Wu Pecoraro

For more information please visit www.nycimageconsultantacademy.com

Is color “the most important thing for a woman”?

“Color is the most important thing for a woman” – Angela Merkel, Chancellor of Germany, in The New Yorker, December 2014

Which blue is your blue

Color is more than science, and it’s more than aesthetics. To those we encounter on a daily basis, color communicates different qualities to which emotions are assigned on various levels. Some of these are temporary hints of emotion; some result in being long-term signifiers of your personality.

Fascination with color is everywhere. Think of paintings. Think about your favorite logos – would they still be your favorites if they were shaded in a different color?

Last year, The Atlantic Monthly gave a great nod to the importance of color and its study, and highlighted the brilliantly laid-out app called Interaction of Color, which is based on a book by Josef Albers.
Colors can make us feel older or younger than we are. They can make us feel energetic, or quite the opposite. They can make us feel happy, sad, or indifferent. Colors can physically make our bodies feel hot (ever worn black in the heat of summer?), or cold (ever worn a white jacket in winter, and been asked if you’re warm enough?). Colors can be tested while dressing, to enhance a mood of sweetness or bitterness, which naturally affect the way you perceive yourself, visually and psychologically.

There is much to be studied about color, and stylists should always think of color as more than just variations on a theme in a client’s wardrobe. (In fact, here at SP Image Consulting, our Personal Color Palette reference tool contains 20 personal palettes with color combination charts, and 4 reference color palettes.)

Here are a few pointers to think about when deciding how to interpret color variations that work for you or your clients:

  • Light colors are perceived to be more friendly and approachable, while dark colors are stronger and more dynamic
  • Light colors move visually outward, and darker colors move visually inward
  • Generally, light colors are more gentle while dark colors are perceived to be more severe
  • Bright colors send a message of enthusiasm, fun, and excitement
  • Dark colors absorb light, and can sometimes seem formal or conservative
  • Colors in the middle range (think of “cream”) are perceived as classic and more neutral
  • Warm colors are thought of as earthy, friendly, and approachable. Cool colors are thought of as classic, authoritative, and refined.

There’s much more to say about color. What color looks best on you? Why?

Shanna Wu Pecoraro

For more information please visit www.nycimageconsultantacademy.com