The Do’s and Don’ts of Public Transport

As city dwellers, most of us find ourselves frequently sitting or standing on a crowded bus, subway, or in a busy transit station en route to or from somewhere. In these situations, our team tends to take an extra moment and engage in one of our favorite pastimes: people watching. This can be as entertaining as any film, TV show or podcast can deliver – but transit etiquette (and lack thereof) also reminds us the importance of maintaining ourselves in public spaces.

 

 

Here are a few tips you’ll want to consider for your next train or subway ride!

 

Listen to the conductor. Tips provided over loudspeakers are made to alert you to schedule and route changes, as well as urgent alerts. Pay attention, and lower your voice when the conductor’s voice comes on, so that others around you can hear as well.

 

Hold onto your trash until you can throw it away. No one likes a litterbug, and plus, holding your items until you can recycle / dispose of them properly saves transit staff from cleanup efforts (which cost everyone in the long run).

 

Stand back from the edge of the platform. Don’t risk your personal safety by being an inch too close to a train barreling toward you. Stand at least one foot back from the edge.

 

Board and de-board the train efficiently. When your train arrives, the correct procedure is to stand aside and queue at either door to allow exiting passengers off first, therein creating much-needed space. Doing the opposite delays everyone – including subsequent train arrivals.

 

Have your ticket/tokens ready before you enter the ticketed area. Don’t wait until you’re halfway through the turnstile to dig out your ticket. This slows you down, and everyone who might be behind you.

 

Being aware and considerate will make you a much happier rider, which you can pass on to your fellow riders.

 

What are your top tips for subway riders?  Tell us on Twitter, or tag us in your next post on Instagram!  https://bit.ly/1OROobY

Finding Your Productivity Flow

Whether you are an independent image consultant or a corporate executive, you likely relate to one of the biggest challenges facing leaders today: your productivity. There is simply too much that distracts from what you think you should be doing: there’s content to read/watch, meetings to attend, scheduling of those meetings, client work, and more. If the “executive overwhelm” is starting to take its toll on your ability to find professional balance, you should consider these 4 steps, which have worked well for our team members and many of our clients these past few years.

 

Determine Your Top 3 Goals in Business: Your goals should be concrete, measurable milestones. For example, you might seek to increase revenues by 15% by this time next year. Or, you might look to find a new job within a certain period of time. Once you’ve determined your goals, write them out. Place these “Top 3 Goals” on your work desk or in a planning device you visit often, as a strong way to ensure that each task you spend time on or each meeting you attend is one that maps back to one of these 3 goals.

 

Work smart: Stop multitasking! For most people, multitasking is like trying to run all over the place at the same time. Instead, work in 60-90 minute blocks of uninterrupted time followed by a 10-15 minute break. Close your email and alerts during critical focus periods. Use time in transit and travel to catch up on messages/news that doesn’t require as much mental bandwidth, so that when you are at your desk, you have the energy and focus to dive into the bigger tasks.

 

Measure Your Execution: “How am I doing?” is a critically important thing to ask yourself, and being able to answer this depends entirely on how measurable the goals are that you set. As time marches on, be sure to check in with yourself regularly to see how your goals are lining up, so you can adjust your schedule and strategy to ensure optimal success.

 

Always Remember the Value of Your Time: A final consideration to keep in mind is the value of your time.  If your standard rate is, say, $350 an hour and you end up wasting one hour in a meeting that wasn’t productive, you’ll start to recognize that you just lost $350.  Thinking about your time from this perspective each day allows you to focus on what’s really important to reach your goals.

 

You can see more of our productivity tips, as well as our fashion and styling insights, by following us on LinkedIn

#leadership, #productivity, #shanna-pecoraro

Verbal and Non-verbal Best Practices

It’s been said over and over that what matters isn’t what you say so much as how you say it.  And perhaps more importantly, it’s understood that not only how you say something, but the total package of non-verbal cues that accompany your message, is the thing that sells an idea through (or kills it!).

In business, our reputations matter greatly. Being able to project a confident, intelligent and resourceful attitude in and out of the office can contribute greatly to one’s ability to sell concepts, products and services internally and externally. A huge part of such confidence comes from being able to quickly interpret verbal communication as well as non-verbal communication like body language, facial expression, and movement.

 

If you’ve mastered the art of reading verbal and non-verbal communication, consider taking your skills to the next level. Being confident in the art of verbal and non-verbal communications is an increasingly important skill, and strong teachers of the skill are needed in tech-friendly cities all over the world.  We offer such a course, as part of our “Become a Corporate Trainer: A Training for Trainers Who Care About Soft Skills”, taking place in Taipei, Taiwan, September 12 – 16, 2018.  The course covers not only verbal and non-verbal best practices, but also covers international business etiquette and ways to build a brand that has impact. This new course is part of the International Soft Skills Testing Accreditation, or ISSTA, which provides a universal standard of professional soft skills in all industries.

 

You can learn more about the course here: www.nyciet.com

 

Some folks excel at reading verbal signals; others are stronger at the non-verbal. Helping clients determine where their strengths lie and where they need to improve will help them in everything they do in life!

 

So, tell us, what do you think is the most important non-verbal trait to observe at an industry conference? We’d love to know your thoughts!

 

Share with us on LinkedIn!