Traveling Together: Common Courtesies in an Age of Rudeness

Kindness

Getty Image

Over the past few weeks, we’ve witnessed a large number of changes in our country’s leadership. From appointments to firings to structural changes and lawsuits, it’s been a fiery few weeks for the New Administration as the DC political set moves past the inauguration.

 

Whatever side you’re on, one thing is for certain: when you travel with a companion, you should always wait for her/him when getting out of a car. There are no exceptions to this rule; whether your companion is your wife, your child, your husband, your business associate or your friend. If you are traveling together to a formal engagement, you should ensure each member of your party has exited the car before moving your next expected location, together. “Together” being the key word here.

 

Treating your spouse/partner/friend kind and respectful way is essential in this age of rudeness. After all, it was Mark Twain who said: “A person should be allowed to have a few redeeming vices, but never bad manners.”

 

When you travel in groups of 2 or more, how do you ensure that your party sticks together as a unit?

#etiquette, #image-consulting, #kindness, #manners, #shanna-pecoraro

Kindness & Courtesy in 2017

kindness & CourtesyWith January comes change, each and every year. But this year, change is even more exaggeratedly in the air. Tomorrow, Donald Trump becomes 45th President of the United States. Through the past year+, we’ve witnessed an incredible volatile campaign that finally concludes this week, and tomorrow, a new chapter begins. Some in our community are nervous; many are excited. Most of the rest of us waiver somewhere in the middle.

 

Politics aside, one practice we can all keep the top of mind this week (and beyond) is – being kind, and being courteous. The two go hand in hand.

 

Kindness begins at home, by greeting your family, friends, roommates, and neighbors with a friendly smile and greeting each day – even when you’re feeling stressed or anxious. When it comes to colleagues, giving good eye contact to acknowledge their ideas, presence, and contributions means so much – even when you have pressing matters to tend to on the smartphone in your hand.

 

Each of us, as family members, workers and as citizens, has a social responsibility to our environment and our communities. Being kind to everyone, even to those who are unkind to you, will pay back in spades someday.

 

Simple acts, like holding the door for people behind you, or returning the shopping cart to the store, make a big difference. Thinking twice before sharing a juicy piece of gossip that might hurt more than help, shows kindness. Writing a handwritten thank you card, or adding a little extra tip for service workers, shows gratitude as well as courtesy.

 

What helps you remember to be kind and courteous during your difficult days?

 

For more image & etiquette info at www.nycimageconsultamtacademy.com

#etiquette, #image-consulting, #image-tips, #manners

Best Practices on Tipping and Gifts During the Holidays

tips-giving

The holiday season is in high gear, and as can be expected, tipping and gift giving during the season for service persons can often become a tricky thing.  A few best practices have served our clients and team well over the years, and we hope that by sharing them, they may help you, too!

 

First, you should always consider your budget first. If you don’t have the budget to give cash, you can always provide a homemade gift accompanied with a handwritten Thank You card. This speaks volumes to those you work with.

 

If you are giving cash, you should consider your relationship with the service provider and the quality of the service you have received on *most* occasions. Consider your location and area, how luxurious the service you’ve been getting is, and remember – if the service professional has been charging you a grandfathered rate this year, you may want to increase his/her tip a bit.

 

For home care, you might consider giving a babysitter up to one evening’s pay, and for nannies or housekeepers, up to a week’s extra pay. Barbers and hairdressers could get extra based on the cost of a haircut, and dog walkers typically get up to one week’s pay. The big question in New York City is always around doorman and supers: how much should a family give?  The average rate is $15-100 for doorman, and $20-100 for supers, depending on how luxurious your building is and the years of service held by the doorman and super.

 

One final helpful hint: Mailmen working for the USPS may not accept items such as cash, checks, gift cards, or any other form of currency. But small gifts that have less than $20 in value (or snacks and beverages which are not part of a meal) can be accepted during the holidays. 

 

Let us know – what other best practices do you follow when it comes to holiday tipping and gifts?

 

#etiquette, #gift-giving, #holiday, #image-tips, #manners, #tipping

Party Tips for Young Ladies

A few months back I met a lovely young lady named Amy on an airplane. Toward the end of the flight, she said: “I have an invitation from my friend Jane for her parent’s Spring Party. Could you give me few tips before I go to the party since I have never been to a grown-up party before?”

Garden partyGarden Party 1

We discussed a few tips and dress options, and later I thought that perhaps this sort of thing could be useful to many young ladies out there. I shared the following tips with Amy, and am now sharing them with you. At grown-up parties, it is best to:

  • Say “hello” to the host and offer to help serve the food/clean up
  • Speak politely; try not to be loud and rude
  • Introduce yourself and offer a friendly handshake with a good eye contact and smile
  • Ask questions; questions are often a good way to start a conversation
  • Take an interest in what is going on
  • Do a little research on your host; find out if they are a member of a club or group that your parents or friends belong to
  • Try leaving some room on your plate for your cup, so you can put your plate on your lap and eat from the plate and drink from the cup in a chair
  • At the end of the party give a friendly goodbye and say “thanks for hosting such a lovely party/evening.”
  • Write a “thank-you” card within 24 hours after the party; if you run out of time, a short and personal Thank-you email can suffice

Some may think these tips are old fashioned, but if you want to be successful in the future, these basic courtesies and acts of kindness are always winning and essential formulas for young ladies to follow.

Read more personal image and etiquette tips at www.nycimageconsultantacademy.com

#consultoria, #conversation, #etiquette, #image, #image-consulting, #image-tips, #manners, #shanna-pecoraro

Courtesy: Lost on us all?

Taking the bus to midtown New York the other day, I noticed a couple of younger folks with their feet draped over the seats in front of me. The bus was relatively empty, but being completely engrossed in their phones, and the feet people weren’t aware that soon the extra multiple seats they were taking would soon be needed.

 

Courtesy Counts

Courtesy Counts

A week later, on the 4 train to downtown, I noticed a woman applying a full face of makeup on the train. She was quick – between the grand central and 14th Street, she was able to go from “ready” to “glam”. But the entire episode wasn’t glamorous; she was on a subway, grooming next to people who would sit in her same seat hundreds of times before the next train cleaning. 

 

Personal Space

Personal Space

Keeping your personal space needs to a minimum in a public place seems to be the most basic of courtesies; even the NYC Metropolitan Transit Authority (@MTA) agrees!

 

Is it ever acceptable to lower your courtesy standard? How do you deal with people who are less than courteous where you live?

 

Tell us on Twitter, @nycimageacademy with the hashtag #courtesycounts

www.nycimageconsultantacademy.com

 

 

#courtesy, #etiquette, #manners

Does Your Taxi-Taking Etiquette Need Some Work?

Whether you’re accustomed to taking a yellow cab daily, or perhaps an Uber, Lyft, or other taxi/ride-share program here and there – you’ve at some point encountered an unexpectedly rude driver. In fact, folks in our community have told us they’ve had such frustrating experiences so many times that they avoid taking taxis as much as possible.

Taxi etiquette rules

Taxi etiquette rules

Whether you like them or not, taxis are ubiquitous in many urban environments and at some point, you’ll need to jump in and take one.

 

We’ve put together a list of taxi etiquette rules to remember, both for taxi drivers and for you – the rider.  Etiquette, like all things in life, works both ways.

 

For Taxi DRIVERS:

  1. Welcome the passenger with a warm “hello” and ask for their destination address and cross street; remember they are your customer from the moment they hail your cab to the moment they step out
  2. Repeat the address to the passenger, and confirm the desired street corner as you near the destination. Speak loudly to avoid miscommunication
  3. Ask the passenger if the temperature is acceptable, and confirm that the current background volume (radio, Taxi TV etc) is acceptable
  4. Drive safely, obeying traffic signals and avoid honking
  5. Use your mobile phone as minimally as possible while a passenger is with you
  6. Ensure your taxi’s bankcard system is functioning; alert riders to any issues with it upon their entering your taxi
  7. Do not smoke in the vehicle at any time
  8. Avoid using heavily scented air fresheners in your taxi. Many people are sensitive to the chemicals in these fresheners, which can cause migraines or allergic reactions to some

 

For Taxi RIDERS:

  1. Greet the driver upon entering the taxi
  2. Be ready to announce your intended destination’s address, and a preferred route if you have one (highways, no highways, etc). Listen to your driver’s opinion on specific routes; they have been on shift most of the day and may be aware of traffic issues or alternate routes you won’t know about
  3. Your driver is not a mind reader – so alert him or her to temperature and volume needs shortly after entering the taxi
  4. Take cups, gum, Kleenex, and other trash with you upon your exit. The taxi is someone’s workspace and a future rider’s safe space, not a trashcan
  5. Put on your seatbelt for the duration of the ride. Your safety is paramount
  6. If you are feeling ill or have motion sensitivities, alert your driver immediately if you need to pull over
  7. Treat the driver with the same respect as you would any other professional; you may end up riding with them again
  8. Upon reaching your destination, pay your bill promptly and tip appropriately. 15% is acceptable for most rides, although late nights rides or heavy rain/snow conditions justify an additional few dollars in tip

 

Do you agree with these basic considerations? Tell us on Twitter @nycimageacademy

 

  • What does your taxi etiquette say about your personal and professional brand? Find out more at our next “3 Steps To a Winning Personal Brand” class on February 20th in New York City. www.nycimageconsultantacademy.com

#conversation-etiquette, #etiquette, #manners, #shanna-pecoraro

Your Personal Style

photo-1446214814726-e6074845b4ceYour image is so much more than the clothing you wear and the way you walk. Your image is the relationship between your outfit, your poise, and your personality. Similarly, color psychology does not necessarily say that including red in a color palette automatically makes it passionate or energetic. What’s important in a color palette is the red, the gray, the black, and the blue’s relationships together. Gestaltism says that the sum is other than the parts. We notice the relationship between red and blue before we notice the colors red and blue individually.

This observation carries to your personal image. A $10,000 suit means nothing if a man is slouching. The fine details of your image must all be coherent and consistent in order to effectively portray your image.

Although there are guidelines to follow when trying to appear a certain way, every person should have their own style. Many different looks can communicate the same message to others. This ‘margin for error’ is the room for your creativity, your personal style, to flourish.

Being an individual is an extremely important piece of the puzzle that is often overlooked. Utilize research-backed strategies to portray the right image, but do so in a unique way. This is why it is so important for professionals to understand the philosophy and thought behind personal image and not just the shallow elements. Actually understanding it is the key to adapt, at any given time, to market and industry changes. If, one day, the way people perceived the color red changed, you must be able to identify that and find a new way to communicate what you were trying to.

Your personal style allows for some buffer through consumer trend volatility, so don’t worry. Just keep in mind that things change and, with it, so should your style. Accurately communicate who you are to others and everything else will follow.

Who has influenced your style the most? Tell us on Twitter @nycimageacademy.

Shanna Wu Pecoraro, AICI CIP

For more information visit http://www.nycimageconsultantacademy.com

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